Facial nerve contralateral

Duration: 13min 18sec Views: 1466 Submitted: 01.05.2021
Category: BBW
She complains of no pain or numbness. You perform a neurologic exam; strength and sensation are normal throughout, with no weakness in the arms or legs and no other neurologic findings. Is this a stroke? Anatomy of Facial Muscle Control Two facial nerves, the right and the left, control all of the muscles in the face. The right facial nerve controls all of the muscles on the right side and the left facial nerve controls all of the muscles on the left side of the face. The facial nerves emerge from the middle of the brainstem the pons and carry motor fibers to the muscles of facial expression.

Patterns of pontine strokes mimicking Bell’s palsy

Differentiating Facial Weakness Caused by Bell's Palsy vs. Acute Stroke | JEMS

NCBI Bookshelf. Dominika Dulak ; Imama A. Authors Dominika Dulak 1 ; Imama A. Naqvi 2. It arises from the brain stem and extends posteriorly to the abducens nerve and anteriorly to the vestibulocochlear nerve.

Differentiating Facial Weakness Caused by Bell’s Palsy vs. Acute Stroke

Facial nerve palsy is a neurological condition in which function of the facial nerve cranial nerve VII is partially or completely lost. It is often idiopathic but in some cases, specific causes such as trauma, infections, or metabolic disorders can be identified. Two major types are distinguished: central facial palsy lesion occurs between cortex and nuclei in the brainstem and peripheral facial palsy lesion occurs between nuclei in the brainstem and peripheral organs. Central facial palsy manifests with impairment of the lower contralateral mimic musculature. In contrast, peripheral facial palsy leads to impairment of the ipsilateral mimic muscles and also affects the eyelids and forehead.
NCBI Bookshelf. Boston: Butterworths; The motor portion, or the facial nerve proper, supplies all the facial musculature. The principal muscles are the frontalis, orbicularis oculi, buccinator, orbicularis oris, platysma, the posterior belly of the digastric, and the stapedius muscle.