History of bikinis in 1940s

Duration: 9min 44sec Views: 1139 Submitted: 28.06.2021
Category: BBW
Face coverings are still required and all other visitor guidelines are in effect, even if you are vaccinated. Though these ensembles were alluring and sexy, they were not necessarily scandalous. The difference between the bikini and its two-piece predecessor is brevity. Simply defined, the bikini is an abbreviated two-piece swimsuit with a bra top and panties cut below the navel. Broadly defined, the bikini represents a social leap involving body consciousness, moral concerns, and sexual attitudes. Named after an A-bomb testing site on a remote Pacific atoll, the bikini has had a history and reputation deserving of its name.

History of the bikini

A History of Women’s Swimwear | Fashion History Timeline

Who would have thought that the name of a remote Pacific atoll, site of atom bomb testing in the late s, could have become wedded in the public mind to one of the sexiest and most enduring clothing items of the summer? The first functional two-piece is said to have been invented by swimwear designer Carl Jantzen in He recruited a nude dancer from the Casino de Paris to model the creation, causing a cultural explosion. For the first time, radically, bikini bottoms dropped below the navel. Photo: Rex Features. Of course, bikinis per se have been around much longer — a mosaic known as Bikini Girls found in a 4th century Roman villa in Sicily depicts women frolicking in revealing two-piece costumes.

Bikini introduced

European women first began wearing two-piece bathing suits that consisted of a halter top and shorts in the s, but only a sliver of the midriff was revealed and the navel was vigilantly covered. In the United States, the modest two-piece made its appearance during World War II , when wartime rationing of fabric saw the removal of the skirt panel and other superfluous material. Meanwhile, in Europe, fortified coastlines and Allied invasions curtailed beach life during the war, and swimsuit development, like everything else non-military, came to a standstill.
Thirteen years after women are allowed to compete in the Olympics, Carl Janzten introduces a two-piece bathing costume to enhance their performance. It's really just shorts and a T-shirt but tight-fitting enough to cause a bit of a scandal. In Europe, women start wearing bathing outfits that reveal a sliver of skin at the waist, and suits shrink stateside as fabric is rationed during World War II. For the most part, hems are shortened and skirts eliminated, but in some cases they do split into two. With the war over and spirits soaring, Parisian designer Jacques Heim, who works mostly with fur, debuts the atome —the world's smallest swimsuit.