Occipital facial location

Duration: 14min 15sec Views: 1076 Submitted: 16.08.2020
Category: BBW
Humans reliably recognize faces across a range of viewpoints, but the neural substrates supporting this ability remain unclear. Recent work suggests that neural selectivity to mirror-symmetric viewpoints of faces, found across a large network of visual areas, may constitute a key computational step in achieving full viewpoint invariance. In this study, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation rTMS to test the hypothesis that the occipital face area OFA , putatively a key node in the face network, plays a causal role in face viewpoint symmetry perception. Each participant underwent both offline rTMS to the right OFA and sham stimulation, preceding blocks of behavioral trials. After each stimulation period, the participant performed one of two behavioral tasks involving presentation of faces in the peripheral visual field: 1 judging the viewpoint symmetry; or 2 judging the angular rotation.

The role of the occipital face area in the cortical face perception network

Occipital face area - Wikipedia

Functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI studies have identified spatially distinct face-selective regions in human cortex. These regions have been linked together to form the components of a cortical network specialized for face perception but the cognitive operations performed in each region are not well understood. In this paper, we review the evidence concerning one of these face-selective regions, the occipital face area OFA , to better understand what cognitive operations it performs in the face perception network. Neuropsychological evidence and transcranial magnetic stimulation TMS studies demonstrate the OFA is necessary for accurate face perception.

The Lateral Occipital Cortex in the Face Perception Network: An Effective Connectivity Study

Try out PMC Labs and tell us what you think. Learn More. The perception of faces involves a large network of cortical areas of the human brain. While several studies tested this network recently, its relationship to the lateral occipital LO cortex known to be involved in visual object perception remains largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic causal modeling DCM to test the effective connectivity among the major areas of the face-processing core network and LO.
Faces are processed in a network of areas within regions of the ventral visual stream. However, familiar faces typically are characterized by additional associated information, such as episodic memories or semantic biographical information as well. The acquisition of such non-sensory, identity-specific knowledge plays a crucial role in our ability to recognize and identify someone we know. The occipital face area OFA , an early part of the core face-processing network, is recently found to be involved in the formation of identity-specific memory traces but it is currently unclear if this role is limited to unimodal visual information.